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Home / Author Archives: Shawn Dominy

Author Archives: Shawn Dominy

Shawn Dominy
Shawn Dominy is a DUI/OVI lawyer in Columbus, Ohio. He is the former President of the Ohio Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, the state delegate to the National College for DUI Defense and a long-time member of the National Association for Criminal Defense Lawyers. Shawn Dominy authored the book ‘I Was Charged With DUI/OVI – Now What?!’ (iUniverse Publishing, 2014) and wrote a chapter in the book 'Defending Vehicular Homicide Cases' (Aspatore Publishing, 2012). He has several other published articles, and he speaks regularly at seminars teaching other lawyers about DUI/OVI. Shawn was named by SuperLawyers® as one of the top 50 lawyers in Columbus, Ohio, and he is listed as one of the 'Best Lawyers in America'® for DUI Defense. Shawn is a lifelong resident of central Ohio: he graduated from Olentangy High School and earned his bachelor’s degree and juris doctor from The Ohio State University. His office is in Columbus, and he lives in Powell with his wife and daughter. He serves with local community organizations, volunteers regularly at his church, and plays regularly with his German Shepherd. For more information, Shawn’s website is www.dominylaw.com, his blog is www.columbusoviattorneyblog.com,

The Body Making its Own Alcohol can Result in a DUI

It may sound like an off-the-wall defense theory, but auto-brewery syndrome is real.  Our bodies can produce alcohol.  Alcohol (ethanol) is basically the product of fermented sugar and yeast.  We ingest yeast in various foods, and at least one kind of yeast is in the human body naturally.  Also present in the body is sugar, either through direct consumption or through the break-down of carbohydrates into glucose.  This means the body is capable of producing alcohol.  Driving with that endogenous ... Read More »

Ohio Supreme Court Clarifies ‘Marked Lanes’ Rule For DUI Cases

In DUI cases across the country, one of the most frequent reasons drivers are pulled over is for a Marked Lanes violation. Laws related to this offense vary from state-to-state. If a police officer observes a Marked Lanes violation, the officer is permitted to make a traffic stop. In Ohio, there has been confusion about what constitutes a Marked Lanes violation. That confusion was recently clarified by a case in the Ohio Supreme Court. Read More »