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Don’t Do “Dewshine”

By Tino Rossini,Toronto, Canada via Wikimedia Commons

By Tino Rossini, Toronto, Canada via Wikimedia Commons

A tragically dangerous new concoction is being consumed by Tennesseans (and likely others) that can potentially lead to death. According to a recent USA Today article, there only four current cases (all originating out of Robertson County, Tennessee) involving teens consuming a newly created “death cocktail” as described by Donna Seger, medical director of the Tennessee Poison Center. The name given to this new poisonous cocktail is “Dewshine.”

As the article details, “Dewshine” is a mixture of the well-known soft drink Mountain Dew® and racing fuel. Yes, take a moment to let that combination digest in your mind. These teenagers in Robertson County are consuming racing fuel. The same substance commonly used in race cars for drag racing and largely composed of methanol (alcohol used solely for industrial and automotive purposes).  Think fuel additive or antifreeze for your vehicle. All alcohols are not created equally. Alcohol that is found in adult beverages is ethanol. Although chemically similar in some respects, ethanol is metabolized in a vastly different manner than methanol — and isopropyl (rubbing alcohol) for that matter.

Seger further discusses in the article the effects methanol has on one’s body once consumed. While methanol may initially have the same effects as consuming ethanol (in an alcoholic beverage), after some time, methanol can result in blurred vision, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. More extreme cases of methanol consumption can lead to seizures, blindness, a coma and even death.

In this author’s opinion, consuming any sort of methanol (racing fuel) is toxic and something that should not be done under any circumstances. Please enjoy Mountain Dew® and other beverages responsibly — but if you value your health and life, don’t even consider consuming “Dewshine.”

About the Author: Steven Oberman has been licensed in Tennessee since 1980, and successfully defended over 2,500 DUI defendants.  Among the many honors bestowed upon him, Steve served as Dean of the National College for DUI Defense, Inc. (NCDD) and currently serves as chair of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers DUI Committee.  Steve was the first lawyer in Tennessee to be Board Certified as a DUI Defense Specialist by the NCDD.

He is the author of DUI: The Crime & Consequences in Tennessee, updated annually since 1991 (Thomson-West), and co-author with Lawrence Taylor of the national treatise, Drunk Driving Defense, 7th edition (Wolters Kluwer/Aspen).  Steve has served as an adjunct professor at the University of Tennessee Law School since 1993 and has received a number of prestigious awards for his faculty contributions.  He is a popular international speaker, having spoken at legal seminars in 30 states, the District of Columbia and three foreign countries.

If you would like to contact the author, please visit: http://www.tndui.com

About Steve Oberman

Since graduating from the University of Tennessee Law School in 1980, Mr. Oberman has become established as a national authority on the intricacies of DUI defense law. Steve is a former Dean of the National College for DUI Defense, co-author of a national treatise ("Drunk Driving Defense" published by Aspen/Wolters-Kluwer), and author of "DUI: The Crime and Consequences in Tennessee" (published by Thomson-Reuters/West). He has taught thousands of lawyers, judges, and members of the general public about the intricacies of this crime. Steve was selected as a Fulbright Scholar to teach at the University of Latvia School of Law in 2019. As a Tennessee DUI attorney, Mr. Oberman has successfully defended over two thousand clients charged with Driving Under the Influence of alcohol and/or drugs. In 2006, Mr. Oberman became the first DUI lawyer in Tennessee to be recognized by the National College for DUI Defense as a Board Certified Specialist in the area of DUI Defense law.

If you would like to contact the author, please visit: http://www.tndui.com


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