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Recording The Police When You Get Pulled Over

Image by: Ed Brown via Wikimedia Commons

Not all officers have recording devices on their persons, or even in their cars. Many times it is advantageous for a defendant to record the details of a police investigation. In order to eliminate the swearing contest that often arises between an officer and driver, almost all mobile platforms now have apps which allow the driver to surreptitiously (secretly) record the police officer (or anyone else for that matter).

USA Today reports that an add-on called, “Police,” may be used with iOS 12 Shortcuts.  Once activated, the program pauses any music that maybe playing, turns down the screen brightness and places the phone in Do Not Disturb mode. Siri then sends a text message to a designated emergency contact to alert them of the situation. The front camera is activated to record a video of the occurrence. Once the video is stopped, a copy is sent to a specified contact and the phone settings are returned to normal.

For those with Android phones, the American Civil Liberty Union released an app called,”ACLU Blue.” This app allows people to record law-enforcement and share the recordings in a public forum.

Other apps exist, including,”I’m getting arrested!,” an app in the Google Place store.  This app enables one to broadcast a custom alert and message in the event they are arrested.

It is important to note that if approached by an officer, one should comply with the orders of the officer regardless of whether the situation is being recorded. Nor should one be so concerned about a recording that they placed themselves in danger of being charged with additional crimes or place themselves, or the officer, in physical danger. A good lawyer and investigator don’t have to have a recording to achieve the goals of their client, but sometimes it is very helpful.

About the Author: Steven Oberman has been licensed in Tennessee since 1980, and successfully defended over 2,500 DUI defendants.  Among the many honors bestowed upon him, Steve served as Dean of the National College for DUI Defense, Inc. (NCDD) and currently serves as chair of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers DUI Committee.  Steve was the first lawyer in Tennessee to be Board Certified as a DUI Defense Specialist by the NCDD.

He is the author of DUI: The Crime & Consequences in Tennessee, updated annually since 1991 (Thomson-West), and co-author with Lawrence Taylor of the national treatise, Drunk Driving Defense, 8thedition (Wolters Kluwer/Aspen).  Steve has served as an adjunct professor at the University of Tennessee Law School since 1993 and has received a number of prestigious awards for his faculty contributions.  He is a popular international speaker, having spoken at legal seminars in over 30 states, the District of Columbia and three foreign countries.

If you would like to contact the author, please visit: http://www.tndui.com

About Steve Oberman

Since graduating from the University of Tennessee Law School in 1980, Mr. Oberman has become established as a national authority on the intricacies of DUI defense law. Steve is a former Dean if the National College for DUI Defense, co-author of a national treatise, ("Drunk Driving Defense" published by Aspen/Wolters-Kluwer) and author of "DUI: The Crime and Consequences in Tennessee" (published by Thomson-Reuters/West). He has taught thousands of lawyers, judges and members of the general public about the intricacies of this crime. As a Tennessee DUI attorney, Mr. Oberman has successfully defended over two thousand clients charged with Driving Under the Influence of alcohol and/or drugs. In 2006, Mr. Oberman became the first DUI lawyer in Tennessee to be recognized by the National College for DUI Defense as a Board Certified Specialist in the area of DUI Defense law.

If you would like to contact the author, please visit: http://www.tndui.com


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